PERSUASIONS ON-LINE V.37, NO.1 (Winter 2016)

Mrs. Elton’s Pearls: Simulating Superiority in Jane Austen’s Emma

Carrie Wright

 

Carrie Wright (email: clwright@usi.edu) teaches geology at the University of Southern Indiana, including the Geology of Gemstones, in which she incorporates the history of jewelry styles.  She is also working towards a Master of Arts in English at USI.

 


Figure 1. “Her Most Excellent Majesty Charlotte, Queen of Great Britain, &c.”
Note the pearls in her crown, clothing and jewelry.  Print from an engraving by Thomas Frye c. 1761-1800.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

 


Figure 2. Queen Elizabeth I holding orb and scepter.  Note the pearls in her crown, clothing and jewelry.
Print by Crispin van de Passe from an engraving, c. 1603-1604.  Courtesy of The Folger Shakespeare Library.

 


Figure 3. James Gillray, “Temperance enjoying a frugal meal.”  King George III and Queen Charlotte.
Note the pearls in the Queen’s necklace and headgear.  Print by James Gillray, c. 1792.
Courtesy of the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University.

 


Figure 4. Jane Austen, author and Cassandra Austen, illustrator.  Page 20 of The History of England
by a partial, prejudiced & ignorant Historian
c. 1791.  Note the illustrations of the malevolent-looking
Queen Elizabeth I and the innocent-looking Mary, Queen of Scots. © The British Library Board, Add.59874, f86.

 


Figure 4. Illustrations of Queen Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots by Cassandra Austen in Jane Austen’s
The History of England by a partial, prejudiced & ignorant Historian c. 1791.
© The British Library Board, Add.59874, f86.

 


Figure 4. Illustrations of Queen Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots by Cassandra Austen in Jane Austen’s
The History of England by a partial, prejudiced & ignorant Historian c. 1791.
© The British Library Board, Add.59874, f86.

 

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